Published On: Thu, Jul 28th, 2022

PIP claimants could end up in court if they fail to report changes in circumstances | Personal Finance | Finance


PIP can help Britons with extra living costs if they have a long-term physical or mental health condition or disability which makes it difficult doing certain everyday tasks or getting around. Everyday tasks include things like washing, dressing, going food shopping, and making decisions about money.

Claimants are warned they could receive a penalty if they do not report their change in circumstances or if they provide wrong information.

According to the rules, a change in circumstances includes personal details changing such as name, address or doctor, or if the help they need changes or if their condition has worsened and they are not expected to live more than six months.

Successful PIP claimants could potentially receive £627 a month depending on how their condition affects them.

To claim PIP, Britons can call the helpline on the Government website.

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They will then be sent a form that asks them about their condition.

On the Government website, it suggests that claimants should include supporting documents if they have them with their application.

This includes documents such as prescription lists, care plans, or information from their doctor or others involved in your care.

Once the form has been completed, some people may need to have an assessment, if more information is needed.

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During the assessment, a health professional will ask claimants about how their condition affects their daily living and mobility tasks and any treatments they have had or will have.

There are two parts to PIP, a daily living part – if someone needs help with everyday tasks, and a mobility part – if someone needs help with getting around.

Whether someone gets one or both parts and how much they get depends on how difficult they find everyday tasks and getting around.

Successful claimants will be paid the following amounts per week depending on their circumstances:

Daily living

  • Standard rate: £61.85
  • Enhanced rate: £92.40

Mobility

  • Standard rate: £24.45
  • Enhanced rate: £64.50

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The Government website states that people could be taken to court or have to pay a penalty if they give wrong information or do not report a change in their circumstances.

As well as the examples given above, change in circumstances also includes if the claimant :

  • Goes into hospital or a care home
  • Goes abroad
  • They’re imprisoned or held in detention
  • Their immigration status has changed, if they’re not a British citizen

It is suggested that Britons should call the PIP enquiry line to report these changes – 0800 121 4433.

If someone needs someone to help them, they can ask for them to be added to their call, however they cannot do this if they use textphone.

Alternatively they can ask someone else to call on their behalf. Applicants will need to be with them when they call.

If someone has been paid too much, they may have to repay the money if they:

  • Did not report a change straight away
  • Gave wrong information
  • Were overpaid by mistake.

When claiming, Britons will need to give information such as their contact details, for example telephone number, their date of birth, their National Insurance number, if they have one (this can be found on letters about tax, pensions and benefits) and their bank or building society account number and sort code.

It will also be useful to have information about the following:

  • Their doctor or health worker’s name, address and telephone number
  • Dates and addresses for any time they’ve spent in a care home or hospital
  • Dates for any time they spent abroad for more than four weeks at a time, and the countries they visited.

As millions of Britons struggle to find the extra money to pay soaring bills, people are being reminded to check they are receiving all the help the benefits they are entitled to.



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